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History/Social Studies

Social Studies Curriculum

Prerequisites: None.

Credits: 2

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation.

This course is designed to enable students to see the geographic “way of looking at world” to
deepen their understanding of major global themes that have manifested themselves over time- for
example, the origin and spread of world religions; exploration, conquest, and imperialism;
urbanization; and innovations and revolutions. The diversity and wonder of God’s creation is modeled
as students gain a deeper understanding of the world around them.
In this course, specific geographic and historical skills and concepts of historical geography are
used to explore these global themes primarily but not exclusively for the period beginning 1000 CE.
The skills are grouped into five sets, each representing a fundamental step in a comprehensive
investigative/inquiring procedure. They are: forming research questions, acquiring information by
investigated a variety of primary and secondary sources, organizing information by creating graphic
representations, analyzing information to determine and explain patterns and trends, and presenting
and documenting findings orally and/or in writing.
The historical geography concepts used to explore the global themes in Geography and History of
the World include change over time, origin, diffusion, physical systems, cultural landscapes, and
spatial distribution and interaction. By using these skills, concepts and the processes associated with
them, students are able to analyze, evaluate, and make predictions about major global
developments. This course is designed to nurture perceptive, responsible citizenship, encourage and
support the development of critical thinking skills and lifelong learning, and to help prepare Indiana
students for employment in the 21st century.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation.

United States History is a two-semester course that builds upon concepts developed in previous
studies of U.S. History and emphasizes national development from the late nineteenth century into
the twenty-first century. After reviewing fundamental themes in the early development of the nation,
students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early
development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, 
people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late
nineteenth century through the present as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States. Students
are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and
concepts in U.S. History. Students develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and
secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation
over time. Through the study of the past, students are empowered to be informed citizens in the
society in which they live and are encouraged to live out their Christian faith in their daily vocations.

Prerequisite: Department Approval

Credits: 2

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation.

United States History, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the
College Board. The course has a chronological frame from 1492 to the present and focuses on
multiple causation and change in United States history over time. A variety of historical themes are
examined in order to place the history of the United States into larger analytical contexts. Students
are expected to analyze and interpret primary sources and develop awareness of multiple
interpretations of historical issues in secondary sources. Historical events and issues in U.S. History
are to be examined from multiple perspectives. Through the study of the past, students are
empowered to be informed citizens in the society in which they live and are encouraged to live out
their Christian faith in their daily vocations.

Credit: 1

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation.

U.S. Government is a semester course that allows the student to examine, question and gain an
understanding of the purpose, principles and practices of the American Government and the United
States Constitution. Students are expected to understand their rights and responsibilities as citizens
and how to exercise the rights and responsibilities in local, state and federal government. The
connection of the U.S. with Christian principles is explored and discussed as they relate to the
development of our country and its government.

Prerequisite: A or B in Social Studies courses and Department approval

Credit: 1

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation.

(Taken in place of regular US Government.)
Honors U.S. Government is a semester course that allows the student to examine, question and gain
an understanding of the purpose, principles and practices of the American Government and the
United States Constitution. Students are expected to understand their rights and responsibilities as
citizens and how to exercise these rights and responsibilities in local, state and federal government.
The connection of the U.S. with Christian principles is explored and discussed as they relate to the
development of our country and its government.
In addition, this course enables the students to show rational thought, understanding and
comprehension on the application of government to their lives and others. It explores the reasons for
a government and the need for it to function for the people, insisting the students develop their own
reasoning about the United States Government and defense of that reasoning.

Prerequisite: None.

Credit: 1

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation.

Economics examines the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by people
as consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, and as government agencies. Key
elements include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of
government, national income determination, money and the role of financial institutions, economic
stabilization and trade. The fundamental idea of economics is focused on scarcity and the choices
people make to satisfy basic needs and wants they have as individuals, families, countries and the
world. The class includes the Christian view of decision makers who give great care in making all
choices and making those choices in a pleasing manner to Jesus Christ.
As stated in Luke 12:42-43, “Who then is that faithful and wise steward whom his lord shall make ruler
over his household, to give them their portion of meat in due season? Blessed is that servant, whom
his lord when he cometh shall find so doing.”

Prerequisite: A or B in Social Studies Classes and Department approval

Credit: 1

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation.

(Taken in place of regular Economics)

Honors Economics examines the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by
people as consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, and as government agencies.
Key elements include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of
government, national income determination, money and the role of financial institutions, economic
stabilization and trade. Also, the student is expected to identify, apply and analyze economic theory.
In addition, the students are to develop and understand a practical economic plan. Using the above
aspects of economics, develop a plan that would be use for economic growth for the individual, the
local or the national community. Understanding that the goals and ideas of economics are to be
successful, the students should have the ability to use and explain how economics impact the whole
of society.
The class includes the Christian view of decision makers who give great care in making all choices
and making those choices in a pleasing manner to Jesus Christ.
As stated in Luke 12:42-43, “Who then is that faithful and wise steward whom his lord shall make ruler
over his household, to give them their portion of meat in due season? Blessed is that servant, whom
his lord when he cometh shall find so doing.”

Prerequisite: None.

Credit: 1

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma Elective course

Students will examine human social behavior from a group perspective, including recurring patterns
of attitudes and actions. Also, the student will examine change of social behavior through time,
among cultures, and in groups. The student will study society, while observing group behavior, social
structures and cultural change.

Prerequisite: None.

Credit: 1

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma Elective course

This course gives an overview of the many areas of psychology. Among these are healthy and
troubled personalities, disorders, treatments, intelligence, learning, conditioning, and testing,
Concepts of psychology are integrated with the principles of Christianity. Students are expected to
use outside sources such as psychology journals to research various topics. All students are required
to give oral presentations and independent projects involving the exploration of human behavior.