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Mathematics

Mathematics (6 credits required)

 

Required courses (2 semesters each) are Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry. Typically these courses are taken in that order. Incoming Freshmen who have demonstrated proficiency in Algebra I in grade 8, may take Geometry.

Students are encouraged to complete additional Math courses beyond the minimum required courses. Courses offered include:
Pre-Calculus (2 semesters),
Discrete Math (1 semester),
Probability and Statistics (1 semester).

Honors courses are offered in Algebra II and Pre-Calculus and AP Calculus AB, BC and ACP Calculus-Physics are also offered. 

Course List and Descriptions

Credits: 2
A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation. Required: Scientific Calculator (at minimum)

Algebra I provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students to succeed in advanced courses. In particular, the instructional program in this course provides for the use of algebraic skills in a wide range of problem-solving situations. The concept of function is emphasized throughout the course. Topics include: (1) operations with real numbers, (2) linear equations and inequalities, (3) relations and functions, (4) polynomials, (5) algebraic fractions, and (6) nonlinear equations.

Daily prayer and devotion are a part of the classroom culture. 

Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra I or Geometry; or D in Algebra 1 and concurrent enrollment in Math Lab per Department approval.

Credits: 2
A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation. Required: Scientific calculator (Graphing calculator preferred.)

Algebra II is a course that extends content of Algebra I and provides further development of the concept of a function. Topics include: (1) relations, functions, equations, and inequalities; (2) conic sections; (3) polynomials, (4) algebraic fractions; (5) logarithmic and exponential functions; (6) sequences and series; and (7) counting principles and probability.

Daily prayer and devotion are a part of the classroom culture. 

Prerequisite: "A" in Algebra I. Department approval.

Credits: 2

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation if taken in place of regular Algebra II.

Required: Graphing Calculator.

This course will contain all topics of Algebra II. Topics include: (1) relations, functions, equations, and inequalities; (2) conic sections; (3) polynomials, (4) algebraic fractions; (5) logarithmic and exponential functions; (6) sequences and series; and (7) counting principles and probability. Students will be required to handle these topics in a rigorous, fast-paced manner. In addition, work and depth in each of the following topics will be extended: trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions, arithmetic and geometric sequences, and matrix applications.

Additional Requirements:  a) Pay for and compete in at least one intramural mathematics contest.  b) Complete at least 5 hours of tutoring another student(s) in high school level mathematics each quarter.

Daily prayer and devotion are a part of the classroom culture. 

 

Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra I,  A or better in Algebra 1 if enrolling in both Geometry and Algebra 2
Credits: 2
Required: Electronic calculator, compass, protractor, straight-edge

A Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma course required for graduation.

Geometry is one of the oldest branches of mathematics. As with all mathematics, it is a science that emphasizes pattern and logic. This class formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Logic and Proofs; Points, Lines, Angles, and Planes; Triangles; Quadrilaterals and Other Polygons; Transformations; Congruency and Similarity; Circles; and Three-dimensional Solids.

In this class the student will work with concepts as both a concrete, physical reality and in an abstract manner emphasizing logic, rigor, and proof. Because geometry works with simple, concrete, physical structures it is the ideal platform for training in the principles of logic, proof, and what is true. As Christians we confess that “God has given us our reason and all our senses...” This course is an excellent opportunity for developing reasoning, logical thinking patterns, wisdom, and an esthetic appreciation for the beauty and order of God’s created world. Critical thinking and depth of practice and understanding will be emphasized so that students throughout the course will experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to find patterns, model, and understand the physical world. 

Prerequisites: “C” or better in Geometry AND in Algebra 2
Credits: 2
Counts as a Mathematics Course for the Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma.

Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry combines the material from Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus into one course. The foundations of algebra and functions developed in previous courses will be extended to new functions, including exponential and logarithmic functions, and to higher-level sequences and series. The course provides students with the skills and understandings that are necessary for advanced manipulation of angles and measurement. Students will also advance their understanding of imaginary numbers through an investigation of complex numbers and polar coordinates. The course is designed for students who expect math to be a major component of their future college and career experiences, and as such it is designed to provide students with strong foundations for calculus and other higher- level math courses. 

Prerequisites: "A" or better in Geometry and Algebra II / Honors Algebra II (with weight adjusted grade). Departmental Approval.
Credits: 2
Counts as a Mathematics Course for the Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma.

Honors Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry combines the material from Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus into one course. The foundations of algebra and functions developed in previous courses will be extended to new functions, including exponential and logarithmic functions, and to higher-level sequences and series. The course provides students with the skills and understandings that are necessary for advanced manipulation of angles and measurement. Students will also advance their understanding of imaginary numbers through an investigation of complex numbers and polar coordinates. The course is designed for students who expect math to be a major component of their future college and career experiences, and as such it is designed to provide students with strong foundations for calculus and other higher- level math courses.

Honors students, compared to the regular course, will cover the material in more depth and at a faster pace. Students will also write programs to implement various formulas and algorithms found in the course.

In addition, in order to receive honors credit for the course, students must prepare and compete in at least one regional, state, or national math contest (such as the Rose-Hulman contest). 

Prerequisite: Algebra II, Department approval.
Credit: 1
Counts as a Mathematics Course for the Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma. Required: Calculator.

Statistics & Probability is a one-semester course designed for students who will undertake higher- level mathematics in college which may not necessarily include calculus. This course develops appreciation for, and skill in, applying statistical techniques in the decision-making process. Topics included are: methods of data collection, organization of data, and graphical techniques for exhibiting data together with measures of central tendency and variation. Basic laws of probability, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and making inferences from samples are also included. Practical examples based on real experimental data are used throughout the course.

Daily prayer and devotion are a part of the classroom culture. 

Prerequisite: Algebra II, Department approval.
Credits: 1
Counts as a Mathematics Course for the Core 40 and Academic Honors Diploma. Required: Calculator.

Finite Mathematics is a one-semester course designed for students who will undertake higher-level mathematics in college which may not necessarily include calculus. Topics include linear election theory, fair division, matrices, counting and probability, graphs and their applications, formal logic, recursion, and graph theory. A problem-solving emphasis is designed to apply the mathematical concepts to business economics as well as the social, life, and physical sciences.

The Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Daily prayer and devotion are a part of the classroom culture. 

Prerequisite : “C” or better in Pre-Calculus and department approval Credit : 2

Description : As high responsibility jobs in the US become more technical and rely less on “art “, calculus has become a mandatory tool for predicting and modeling real world events . It is the goal of this course that the student (1) see through calculus the order and beauty that God put into the universe, (2) develop the skills and concepts necessary to perform confidently in fields requiring an operational knowledge of basic calculus, and (3) develop a can do attitude toward problem solving. This calculus course is geared to provide the skills and concepts necessary to meet the ETS Advanced Placement Calculus AB standards of performance. The student is expected and required to take the AP exam.

Basic prerequisite skills: ability to solve and graph functions (polynomial, rational, transcendental, and trigonometric) with and without an electronic aid, use set notation to describe domains and ranges, interpret and manipulate various forms of linear equations, and to show work necessary for “proving” answers are correct.

Topics: the basics of differential and integral calculus, introductions to some advanced techniques of differentiation and integration, and non-routine applications in mathematics

Students will prepare for and compete in at least one extracurricular mathematics competition.